Medicare and Medicaid are both healthcare programs but they differ as to who and what they cover. Medicare is fully funded by the federal government, while Medicaid is funded jointly by the federal government and the states.

Medicare cares for people 65 and older or for people who have a qualifying disability. The main coverage benefits are standardized nationwide. Medicare Advantage plans can add on services, i.e., supplemental benefits, as long as they meet federal guidelines.

Medicaid, on the other hand, is geared toward people with low incomes and the medically needy. Because Medicaid programs are run by the state, eligibility depends on where you live. Some states limit coverage to families, pregnant women, and children, whereas states that adopted Medicaid expansion as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) extend coverage to single adults too. Benefits also vary state to state.

Some people may be eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This is known as being dual eligible.

Medicare vs Medicaid: What’s the difference between Medicare and Medicaid?

Medicare and Medicaid are both healthcare programs but they differ as to who and what they cover. Medicare is fully funded by the federal government, while Medicaid is funded jointly by the federal government and the states.
Medicare cares for people 65 and older or for people who have a qualifying disability. The main coverage benefits are standardized nationwide. Medicare Advantage plans can add on services, i.e., supplemental benefits, as long as they meet federal guidelines.
Medicaid, on the other hand, is geared toward people with low incomes and the medically needy. Because Medicaid programs are run by the state, eligibility depends on where you live. Some states limit coverage to families, pregnant women, and children, whereas states that adopted Medicaid expansion as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) extend coverage to single adults too. Benefits also vary state to state.
Some people may be eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid. This is known as being dual eligible.